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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
sandy which obviously affected millions of people and really caught the public's imaginationment but it didn't end. coverage of other hurricanes h there is a beginning, a middle and an end. the fact is what sandy did or seems to have done is to take the idea of climate change from an abstraction, something that scientists and experts debated, to something that millions of people along the east coast and in manhattan and staten island and the other boroughs in new york city experienced for themselves and it started a debate. we don't know obviously what the long-term consequences are, but it does suggest there is something different about this story and its long-term implications. >> woodruff: and it's interesting, michael, because we've had big storms in this country before. >> sure. >> woodruff: but there was something different about this one? >> i think people are getting a little more alert to it politically. and one thing that historians of the future do is if something terrible happens, if climate change over the next 50 years or so achieve great injury to this earth, histo
26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reality is setting in, and it's very, very painful. >> suarez: at the white house, president obama observed a moment of silence with his staff, and church bells tolled across the country. the national cathedral in washington chimed 28 times for the school victims, and for the shooter, adam lanza, and his mother, nancy lanza. religious leaders at the observance called for congress to act on gun violence in the wake of the tragedy. >> if the killing of these 20 children will not move us to enact meaningful legislation that values god-given human life over an amendment crafted for a time and a nation that bears no resemblance to our own, then there is little hope for us. >> suarez: in a new video, the president said nearly 200,000 people have signed a petit
by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think it's a little bit of both. citigroup, let's not forget, had to go in for two rounds of bailout money. there was even scuttlebut that the white house suggested this was a bank that should fail, that it was beyond rescue. it still has $1 fent billion of bad seeftz its sheets it's looking to get rid of. there are no easy answers for it. there is no overnight turnaround. and at the same time, it's a public company and shareholders are saying, "show me the progress." >> ifill: roben farzhad of "bloomberg business week," thank you
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)